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Suicide Prevention Resources

Page history last edited by Keith Schroeder 2 years, 2 months ago

Suicide Prevention Resources

 

IN AN EMERGENCY, CALL OR CONTACT THE FOLLOWING HOTLINES

FAMILY SERVICES OF NE WISCONSIN  920-436-8888 OR  http://www.familyservicesnew.org/

THE NATIONAL HOTLINE 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) OR http://www.hopeline.com/

THE NATIONAL SUICIDE PREVENTION LIFELINE 1-800-273-TALK (8255)

 

http://www.sprc.org/stateinformation/statepages/showstate.asp?stateID=49

Wisconsin Suicide Prevention Resource Page

 

http://www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org/

COPING WITH SUICIDE

Suicide Warning Signs: Should you seek counseling?  Kids who are thinking about suicide often send out signals. Concerned educators/parents should watch out for the following signs:

  • change in eating and sleeping habits

  • withdrawal from friends, family, and regular activities

  • violent actions, rebellious behavior, or running away

  • drug and alcohol use

  • unusual neglect of personal appearance

  • marked personality change

  • persistent boredom, difficulty concentrating, or a decline in the quality of schoolwork

  • frequent complaints about physical symptoms, often related to emotions, such as stomachaches, headaches, fatigue, etc.

  • loss of interest in pleasurable activities

  • not tolerating praise or rewards

A teenager who is planning to commit suicide may also:

  • complain of being a bad person or feeling "rotten inside"

  • give verbal hints with statements such as: "I won't be a problem for you much longer," "Nothing matters," "It's no use," and "I won't see you again"

  • put his or her affairs in order, for example, give away favorite possessions, clean his or her room, throw away important belongings, etc.

  • become suddenly cheerful after a period of depression

  • have signs of psychosis (hallucinations or bizarre thoughts)

Source:
American Academy of Adolescent Psychiatry: Teen Suicide
http://www.aacap.org/publications/factsfam/suicide.htm


What You Should Do If Your Child/Student Threatens Suicide

It is often thought that the tendency toward suicide is inherited and passed down from parent to child. This is not true. Though suicide tends to run in families, it is believed that this is due to the fact that depression and other related depressive illnesses have a genetic component, and if left untreated, can lead to suicide.

If your child threatens to commit suicide, always take his or her statement seriously, acknowledge the validity of his or her feelings, and seek evaluation from a child or adolescent psychiatrist or another physician. Also, don't be afraid to talk to your child about his or her feelings. Asking won't encourage your child to do something he or she wasn't already thinking about. Also, asking will let your child know that you care, and that it is okay for him or her to talk about his or her problems.


The following Web sites provide excellent resources for parents, guardians, teachers, and students who are seeking additional information on how to help cope with depression and suicidal thoughts:

Help for Suicidal Teens

http://www.parentingteens.com/index/Troubled+Teens/Teen+Suicide

 

What to Do If a Friend or Relative is Suicidal

http://www.nmha.org/index.cfm?objectId=C7DF901D-1372-4D20-C8265C5E278C11C0

 

If You're Thinking About Suicideā€¦Read This First
http://www.metanoia.org/suicide/

 

National Institute of Mental Health:  Depression

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml

 

NSSP: Suicide Prevention and Depression Resources
http://www.mentalhealth.org/suicideprevention/concerned.asp

 

KidsHealth: A Healthy Mind

http://kidshealth.org/teen/your_mind/

 

KidsHealth: When your Friend Talks About Suicide

http://kidshealth.org/teen/your_mind/friends/talking_about_suicide.html

 

Suicide.org

http://www.suicide.org/

 

The Trevor Project

http://www.thetrevorproject.org/home2.aspx

 

American Foundation of Suicide Prevention

http://www.afsp.org/


If you have lost a loved one to suicide, you may want to visit the following sites, which provide information and support for suicide survivors:

Lifekeeper Foundation
http://www.lifekeeper.org/

 

Survivors of Suicide

http://www.survivorsofsuicide.com/

 

Road2Healing

http://www.road2healing.com/

 

Child Suicide Survivor

http://childsuicide.homestead.com/

 

Loving Outreach
http://www.lovingoutreach.org/

Other Suicide Resources

The Jason Foundation

http://www.jasonfoundation.com/

 

Suicide Awareness Voices of Education
http://www.save.org/

 

Suicide Prevention Action Network USA
http://www.spanusa.org/

 

Yellow Ribbon Suicide Prevention Program for Teens
http://www.yellowribbon.org/

 

American Foundation for Suicide Prevention

http://www.afsp.org/

 

Suicide Hotlines
http://suicidehotlines.com/

 

CDC's Suicide Prevention Information

http://www.cdc.gov/ncipc/dvp/Suicide/

 

National Youth Violence Prevention Resource Center

http://www.safeyouth.org/scripts/topics/depression.asp

http://www.safeyouth.org/scripts/topics/suicide.asp

 

American Academy of Pediatrics

http://www.aap.org/healthtopics/depression.cfm

 

National Institute of Mental Health

http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/suicide-prevention/index.shtml


The National Strategy for Suicide Prevention
http://www.mentalhealth.org/suicideprevention/strategy.asp

 

Love Doesn't Have to Hurt Teens
http://www.apa.org/pi/cyf/teen.pdf

 

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